Communication & Arts Division

Courses

Academic Skills Reading
Academic Skills Writing
Art/Graphic Design
Art History
Communication/Film
Drama
English/Literature
Humanities
International Languages
Journalism
Music

Academic Skills Reading

Reading and Writing courses formerly taught in the Academic Skills Division (course numbers beginning with 00) have been renamed to accommodate the assimilation into the English Department. These courses count as institutional credit and are used to figure grade point average (GPA) but do not count toward a degree.

READ 0003 Preparing For College Reading - (F, S). Designed for both first and second language students, the class will focus on improving comprehension through frequent practice with text and software at the appropriate reading level and will emphasize vocabulary building, finding main idea and recognizing supporting details. Successful completion of this course will allow entry into READ 0033. No prerequisite.

READ 0033 College Reading - (F,S, Summer). An upper level reading course designed to help students gain skills they can apply to college textbook and everyday reading requirements. Vocabulary, comprehension, and thinking and study strategies are emphasized along with an introduction to the library. Successful completion allows entry into reading intensive college level studies. Prerequisite: READ 0003 Preparing For College Reading with a C or better, or minimum placement score: ACT-14 or COMPASS-61.

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Academic Skills Writing

NOTE: Developmental Reading and Writing course numbers begin with 00. These courses count as institutional credit and are used to figure grade point average (GPA) but do not count toward a degree.

ENGL 0023 Grammar and Mechanics of Writing – (S, F, SUM On Demand). A three hour course designed for first or second language learners to review basic grammar, mechanics, usage, and punctuation of standard written English. Students will develop writing skills with a concentration on correct sentence structure. Successful completion allows entry into ENGL 0053: Beginning Writing.

ENGL 0041, 0042, 0043 Foundations of Writing - (F, S). This is a course to address the punctuation, verb forms, patterning, and usage skills needed by first or second language students. The student may enroll in one, two, or three credit hours. The schedule is planned on an individual student basis, with weekly computer lab time and instructor conference at an arranged time. Home use of a computer tutorial and conferencing by e-mail are possible. This course may be taken along with Composition I or II, or alone, and can be repeated. Enrollment for one credit hour is allowed through the eighth week of the regular semester. No prerequisite.

ENGL 0043-DL-WWW is offered through distance learning with instructor consent. It is the same course content as above (ENGL 0043), but the format is different. This course is taught on-line as distance learning.

ENGL 0053 Beginning Writing - (F, S, SUM). A course designed to review grammar, mechanics, usage, and sentence structure with concentration on developing writing skill through paragraphing. Computer software tutorials support the lecture course. Successful completion allows entry into Intermediate Writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 0041, 0042, 0043 (Formerly ACSK 0041, 0042, 0043) Foundations of Writing with a C or better, or minimum placement score: ACT-10 or COMPASS 14.

ENGL 0063 Intermediate Writing - (F, S, SUM. on demand). The study and practice of sentence structure rules, critical thinking skills, writing as a step by- step process, and basic grammar. Students will learn to express ideas and opinions in clear, organized paragraphs and essays. Students will also learn and use word processing as it applies to academic writing. Successful completion allows a student to enter English Composition I. Prerequisite: ENGL 0053 Beginning Writing with a C or better or minimum placement score: ACT-13 or COMPASS-42.

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Art/Graphic Design

ART 1033 Introduction to Studio Art - (F, S). Through hands-on experience involving basic visual elements, students apply principles of design to projects in painting, drawing and sculpture.

ART 1303 Introduction to Drawing - (F, S). A studio course focusing on projects dealing with the materials and techniques of drawing, including basic concepts of line, perspective and value.

ART 1313 Design I (F, S). Students in this course learn to use the elements and principles of design as a basis for all creative work in the visual arts. Students are introduced to the vocabulary of design as well as the use of the computer as a design tool. This course must be taken before any Graphic Design course.

ART 1323 Design II (Sculpture) - (F, S). Studio projects offer an opportunity to work in three dimensional forms, using paper, wire, plaster, wood or clay.

ART 2003 Advanced Drawing - (F, S). Further exploration of drawing techniques with emphasis on experimentation and interpretation, Prerequisite: ART 1303 Introduction to Drawing or consent of instructor.

ART 2013 Figure Drawing - (F, S). Continuation of advanced drawing with emphasis on human figure studies. Prerequisite: ART 1303 Introduction to Drawing or consent of instructor.

ART 2103 Introduction to Painting (oil or acrylic) - (F, S). A basic creative approach to painting that includes color mixing and techniques, still life, landscape and portrait painting.

ART 2113 Advanced Painting (oil or acrylic) -(F, S). Enhances the use of materials, procedures, subject matter and approaches to painting.  Prerequisite: ART 2103 Introduction to Painting or consent of instructor.

ART 2123 Introduction to Watercolor - (F).  An exploration of the basic concepts and techniques of watercolor painting.

ART 2133 Advanced Watercolor - (S). A creative approach to watercolor painting with an emphasis on experimentation and mixed media. Prerequisite: ART 2123 Introduction to Watercolor or consent of instructor.

ART 2203 Sculpture - (S, F). Continuation of three-dimensional design using additive and subtractive techniques. Emphases is on the studies of the human form. Clay will be the primary medium for exploration. Prerequisite: ART 1323 Design II - Sculpture or consent of instructor.

ART2313 Computer Applications for Fine Art – (F). This course is an introduction to digital imaging in the visual arts, beginning instruction in image creation, manipulation and processing. Introduction to computer imaging software, scanning software, scanning and printing of art images.

ART 2333 Color Studies (F, S). In this course, students investigate color qualities and relationships through research and studio problems, using both traditional and digital techniques and experiments. The class focuses on the use of Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: ART 1313 Design I.

ART 2363 Graphic Design I (F, S). This course is an involved study of the principles and techniques of graphic design as applied to exercises and projects representative of the advertising and promotional world. Students enrolling in this course must have a strong knowledge of Adobe Illustrator™ that can be gained in NWACC’s Design I course. Prerequisites:  ART 1303 Introduction to Drawing, ART 1313 Design I.

ART 2364 Advanced Graphic Illustration - (S). Students will explore the styles and techniques of commercial illustration (books and magazines, music CDs, posters, packaging, etc.) and inking with basic illustration skills such as proportion, perspectives, and composition. (Pastel, watercolor, acrylic, etc. will also be used.) Students will learn both conventional hand rendered and computer illustration techniques. Prerequisites: ART 2363 Graphic Design 1 and either ART 2123 Intro to Watercolor or ART 2103 Intro to Painting

ART 2373 Graphic Design II: Symbols (F, S). This course focuses on the development of logos, pictographs, symbols and conceptual symbolism. Projects are realized through traditional and digital techniques. The course emphasizes the use of several field standard software packages. Prerequisite: ART 2363 Graphic Design I

ART 2383 Graphic Design III: Layout & Prepress (F, S). This course focuses on the organizational principles and practices of layout design.  Projects are realized through traditional and computer techniques. A strong emphasis is given to the use of computers and software for preparing designs for printing. Prerequisite: ART 2363 Graphic Design I

ART 2393 Advanced Graphic Design I (Special Problems in Graphic Design) (F, S). This course is an advanced course in the study of graphic design principles and techniques. The areas of focus vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ART 2373 Graphic Design II.

ART 2403 Advanced Graphic Design II (Special Problems in Graphic Design) (F, S). This course is the same as Advanced Graphic Design I. Students should register for this version of the course if they are taking the class a second time for additional credit. Prerequisite: Art 2393 Advanced Graphic Design I.

ART 2803 Introduction to Photography (F, S, SUM). This is an introductory course in the study of photography. The course deals with composing, shooting, developing, printing, presenting, and critiquing black & white photographic film and prints. Students are required to have a working 35mm camera and lens with manual settings for aperture and shutter speed.

ART 2813 Advanced Photography (S). This course deals with a more advanced study of black & white film and printing techniques, and introduces students to a variety of other areas of photography including color, alternative processes and digital imaging. Prerequisites: ART 2803 Intro to Photography or instructor’s consent.

ART 2833 Video Production/Editing (F, S). An introduction to Video Pre-production, Production, and Post-production. Digital, portable video cameras along with digital editing equipment and nonlinear digital editing software will be used. Prerequisites: Art 1313 Design I or consent of instructor.

ART 2844 3D Logo Animation (F, S). An introduction to computer 3D logo animation: Pre-Production, Production, and Post-production with an emphasis on Lightwave3D animation and modeling software. Prerequisites: Art 1313 Design I or consent of instructor.

ART 2854 Interactive CD Authoring (F, S). An introduction to the production of CD-ROMs for portfolios, marketing, presentations, training and instruction. Focus on Macromedia Director, FlashMX or other interactive authoring software. Prerequisites: Art 1313 Design I or consent of instructor.

ART 2863 Digital Photography – (F) This is an introductory course in digital photography, including composing, lighting, exposing, printing, editing, critiquing, presenting, and more. Students are required to have a digital SLR camera with adjustable manual settings for aperture and shutter speed.

ART 2903 Web Animation (F, S). An introduction to web animation, currently focusing on the program Macromedia Flash, which is used to create rich animation content in web site designing. Prerequisite: ART 1313 Design I or consent of instructor.

ART 2953 Graphic Design Internship (F, S). This course requires that students obtain employment in a position relating to graphic design with a local business. Students are helped to prepare their portfolio and résumé, and guided toward possible positions. The students must interview and work out a contractual agreement regarding their duties and responsibilities with their employer. The position must be supervised and expose the student to some aspect of the graphic design profession. This should be one of the final courses taken in this degree program. Prerequisite:  Approved written plan and consent of instructor and division chair.

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Art History

ARHS 1003 Art Appreciation - (F, S, SUM). A general introduction to the visual arts. Lectures on art theory and an introduction to art history, plus demonstrations, films, slides, and field trips.

ARHS 2823 The History of Photography and Design - (F, S). A survey of photography and design.

ARHS 2913, 2923 Art History I, II - (F, S). Survey and analysis of movements and masterpieces of art from the Stone Age to the present. Art History I introduces the student to art forms from the Stone Age through the Middle Ages. Art History II explores artists and works from the Renaissance to the present.

Courses may be taken in sequence or separately.

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Communication/Film

COMM 1003 Film Arts - (F, S). Film Arts is a transferable Humanities/Fine Arts course in American film, concentrating on the evolution of film and its ideology from the late 1800’s to the present . The course is designed to increase students’ understanding of film as an art form and to develop critical analysis skills necessary to interpret mediated information.  Prerequisite: ENGL 1013 English Comp I.

COMM 1013 Mass Communication - (ON DEMAND). Mass Communication is an introduction to media for the masses, including an examination of radio, television, print, electronic, and computer media and the historical development of these media types.

COMM 1303 Public Speaking - (F, S, SUM). Application of the communication techniques needed to organize and deliver oral messages in a public setting.

COMM 2323 Interpersonal Communications - (S). Interpersonal communication is an in-depth study of the principles of interpersonal communication in the context of classroom, workplace, family and other personal situations. A seminar/workshop curriculum utilizes lectures, video simulations of interpersonal situations, actual simulations of interpersonal situations, and the opportunity to practice and study these situations on campus and off campus.

COMM 2403 Oral Interpretation - (F). Oral Interpretations focuses on the analysis and oral presentation of various literary genres including essay, prose, poetry, and drama.

COMM 2503 Small Group Communication. - (F). Small group communication focuses on the process of communication and working effectively in small groups by understanding and studying the dynamics of small group communication and interaction, with emphasis on problem-solving techniques, leadership styles, group roles, and the mechanics of group process. Students will participate in a variety of small group presentations.

COMM 290V Special Topics-Independent Study (On Demand). A student who wishes to work independently with an instructor on an individual topic may earn 1 to 3 hours credit. Permission from instructor and a written proposal are required in advance of registration.

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Drama

DRAM 1003 Introduction to the Theatre – (F, S). Introduction to the theatre is a general survey of the field of theatre, emphasizing the study of various play genre, acting styles, directing techniques, scenery, lighting, and costume design as well as the history of the theatre.

DRAM 1653 Acting I - (F). This course examines the principles of acting, including stage directions, use of stage area, coordination of voice and body, and practice scenes from plays. Variable credit of 1-3 hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

DRAM1753 Creative Dramatics - (S). This course examines the fundamentals principles of drama as an educational tool in working with children. Acting, music, art, and puppetry will be used. Performances are scheduled off-site at area grade schools in Rogers and Bentonville. All performances are scheduled during the regular class time.

DRAM 2683 Acting II – (S). Advanced course in Acting (continuation of Acting I). Students will learn background and theories of acting, how to analyze scripts and characters, and learn advanced methods of use of voice and body. Monologue and duet acting scenes will be presented with a showcase performance during the final exam, open to the public.  Prerequisites: DRAM1653

DRAM 2723 Drama Practicum - (F, S). Production of a play for public performance. Performers are selected by audition and technical roles assigned. Students must be able to participate in scheduled weekend performances. Variable credit may be taken of 1, 2, or 3 hours each semester. The course may be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours toward a degree at NWACC.

DRAMA 290V-Special Topics-Independent Study (On Demand). A student who wishes to work independently with an instructor on an individual topic may earn 1 to 3 hours credit. Permission from instructor and a written proposal are required in advance of registration.

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English/Literature

ENGL 1013 English Composition I - (F, S, SUM). Guiding the student through the process of writing with regular practice and analysis of effective writing, this first course of the composition sequence emphasizes the writing of clear, concise, developed academic prose. Generally students are expected to follow the rules of Standard Edited English, to understand paragraph development, and to write a research assignment involving the integration of sources. Prerequisite: minimum placement score (19 ACT, 75 Compass), completion of ENGL 0063 Intermediate Writing or CIEP 0063 with a C or better.

ENGL 1013H. English Composition I, Honors - (F). Course begins the composition sequence by teaching skills to enable the student to write clear, concise expository prose and to improve critical thinking skills through the writing process. The student prepares for other college writing assignments by evaluating and synthesizing academic sources in print and online. This is an honors course. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information. Prerequisites: Minimum placement score (25 ACT, 85 COMPASS)

ENGL 1023 English Composition II - (F, S, SUM). Although the primary reading text is an anthology of literature, the emphasis in this course continues to be on the student’s writing academic prose. The student uses the writing process introduced in Composition I using literature as an academic subject for analysis, interpretation, critical appraisal, and research. Prerequisite: completion of English 1013 with a C or better.

ENGL 1023H. English Composition II, Honors - (S). Course is a continuation of English Composition I. Emphasis is placed on writing academic prose using literature as a subject for analysis, interpretation, critical appraisal, and research. This is an honors course. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1013 or ENGL 1013H with a B or better.

ENGL 0133 PLA Portfolio Development course - (F, S) The PLA Portfolio course offers students with prior learning from work experience an alternative to course work by teaching them how to translate experience into learning outcomes. These learning outcomes, along with relevant and valid documentation, are matched to specific courses for which credit may be requested. Students will be taught how to create a portfolio that will contain specific elements in a required format. This course will also allow students to develop an understanding of where to begin in building on their existing knowledge. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1013 Composition I with a C or better. (Pass/Fail)

ENGL 2013 Technical Writing - (F, S, SUM). Skills learned in regular composition classes are directed towards the products that are written in organizations, offices and laboratories. The writing assignments may include extended definitions, evaluations, instructions, arguments, letters of various types, memorandums, and a collaborative research project which culminates in a formal report and/or a finished product. Emphasis is on improving the communication skills of students seeking a career in technical or scientific fields. Prerequisite: Completion of English 1013 with a C or better.

ENGL 2023 Imaginative Writing I - (F, S). Designed to teach students the fundamental techniques of fiction and poetry. Students write original poems and stories and critique student and professional models in a workshop setting. Some uses of visiting authors and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2033 Imaginative Writing II - (On Demand). Designed as a follow-up course for students of Imaginative Writing I. Students may continue working on material developed in the first semester course or pursue new material in either Fiction or Poetry. Emphasis will be on developing work into publishable material. Workshop setting will allow students to critique each other’s work in a friendly and cooperative setting. Some individual conferences will be conducted and visiting authors may be invited to lecture on the writer’s life. Prerequisite: English 2023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2113 Survey of British Literature to Romanticism - (F). Students in this course explore the literature of British Isles. The students begin their journey with life in Anglo-Saxon times of the Venerable Bede and Beowulf. As they wend their way to modern times, they progress through the Middle English and the Renaissance with side excursions along the way. The course ends with the literature of the Enlightenment. The students in this course become familiar with the culture and history of Great Britain as they read. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a C or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2123 Survey of British Literature from Romanticism (F,S). This course finds the student in the literature from the Romantic period in Britain. The students move from the free-spirited Romantics to the rule-bound Victorians on the way to the modern age with its angst and energy. The students read, analyze, and interpret the literature of the British Empire, as they learn about the culture and life of the Britons. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2213 Survey of World Literature to 1650- (F, S, SUM). Students in this course read the oldest of literatures. Typically the course includes the generally accepted literary masterpieces of western culture. While such literature is removed from the student’s experience by time, history, and culture, its ties to contemporary life are more compelling than its differences. These issues are frequently addressed as the student learns to read, interpret, and analyze this literature. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2213H Survey of World Literature to 1650 Honors (F). A survey of major literary and lesser known works from Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America composed from classical times to 1650. Specific literary works will vary. The aim of the course is to deepen appreciation and understanding of individual works, to examine their relationship to other literature in their tradition as well as literary traditions of other cultures, and to achieve a sense of each work as an expression of the culture that originated it. This is an honors course. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 1013 or 1013H and 1023 or 1023H with a B or better.

ENGL 2223 Survey of World Literature from 1650 - (F, S, SUM). This course introduces the student to the literature of the world as well as the literature from English-speaking countries. The students may read literature from Asia, Africa, and South America as well as from Europe and North America. Reactions and comparisons to the students’ lives are explored as the students read, interpret and analyze this literature. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2223H Survey of World Literature from1650 Honors (S). This course introduces the student to the literature of the world as well as the literature from English-speaking countries. The students may read literature from Asia, Africa, and South America as well as from Europe and North America. Reactions and comparisons to the students’ lives are explored as the students read, interpret and analyze this literature. This is an honors course. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 1013 or 1013H and ENGL 1023 or 1023H with a B or better.

ENGL 2313 Survey of American Literature to the Civil War - (F). From Native American tales and songs to the haunting stories of Edgar Allan Poe and the intriguing poetry of Emily Dickinson, students read and discuss what Americans were singing, talking, and writing about during America’s earliest days up till the War Between the States. Students experience American history through the eyes of explorers like Christopher Columbus, religious leaders like William Bradford, settlers like Anne Bradstreet, patriots like Thomas Paine, outspoken women like Abigail Adams, individualists like Henry David Thoreau, slaves like Harriet Jacobs, romantics like Nathaniel Hawthorne, and innovators like Walt Whitman. The multicultural selections in the textbook help students understand the viewpoints of Americans from diverse backgrounds and ethnicity. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 2323 Survey of American Literature Since the Civil War (S). Students will read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama by major American authors from the post-Civil War era up through the present times such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Robert Frost, Henry James, Willa Cather, Langston Hughes, Arthur Miller, and Toni Morrison. In addition, students will examine how literary trends like realism, naturalism, imagism, and post-modernism influenced the writing of the time. Several texts by Americans from diverse backgrounds and ethnicity enhance the student’s awareness of America’s multicultural literary heritage. Prerequisite: English 1013 and 1023 with a grade “C” or better, or consent of instructor.

 

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Humanities

HUMN 1003 Exploring the Humanities - (S). An introduction to the general concept of the humanities and the various disciplines of art, literature, music, mythology, theatre, film, and how they interrelate. Students will develop critical thinking and writing skills through class discussion, attendance at local performances, and frequent compositions. Prerequisite: ENGL 1013.

HUMN 1013 Exploring Cultural Diversity -(F). An introduction to the various cultures which contribute to the diversity of the United States, in general, and Northwest Arkansas, in particular, through presentations by representatives of various cultures and the study of fiction, non-fiction, art, music, film, theater, and through research projects. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 1013.

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International Languages

International language courses are considered electives and can contribute appropriate elective credit to most degree plans of the college. Otherwise, credit from international language courses is deemed transfer credit and will be accepted by all Arkansas four-year colleges. Most four-year institutions require 9-12 hours of international language study as part of their BA, BFA, and BS degrees. However Conversational Spanish I and II will not normally transfer degree credit to a university to satisfy international language requirements. Students with prior language experience should follow pre-requisite guidelines and contact the International Languages Department for questions regarding placement. (The information above does not pertain to the College Intensive English Program [CIEP].)

ARAB 1003 Elementary Arabic I – (F). An introductory course in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing standard Arabic. Emphasis on learning the alphabet and Arabic script.

ARAB 1013 Elementary Arabic II. A continuation of ARAB 1003. Further development of basic skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of standard Arabic

FREN 1003 Elementary French I - (F). Introductory course designed for students beginning the college-level study of French. Presentations of vocabulary, grammatical structures, and Francophone culture enable the student to understand, speak, read, and write basic French. No prerequisite.

FREN 1013 Elementary French II - (S). This course is a continuation of FREN 1003. The study of vocabulary, grammatical structures, and Francophone culture enables students to strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. PREREQUISITE: Completion of FREN 1003 with a C or better, or department consent.

FREN 2003 Intermediate French I - (F). Further development of language skills in French, with attention to reading, composition, and conversation. It includes readings in French literature, culture, and civilization and extensive grammar review. Class is conducted primarily in French. PREREQUISITE: Completion of FREN 1013 with a C or better, three years of recent high-school French, or department consent.

FREN 2013 Intermediate French II - (S). This course is a continuation of FREN 2003. It includes readings in French literature, culture, and civilization. Grammar is reviewed and expanded. Class is conducted primarily in French. PREREQUISITE: Completion of FREN 2003 with a C or better, or department consent.

GERM 1003 Elementary German I - (F). Introductory course designed for students beginning the college-level study of German. Presentations of vocabulary, grammatical structures, and German culture enable the student to understand, speak, read, and write basic German. No prerequisite.

GERM 1013 Elementary German II - (S). This course is a continuation of GERM1003. Presentations of vocabulary, grammatical structures, and German culture enable the student to strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. PREREQUISITE: Completion of GERM1003 with a C or better, or department consent.

GERM 2003 Intermediate German I - (F). Further development of language skills in German, with emphasis on reading, composition, and oral practice. It includes readings in German literature, culture, and civilization. PREREQUISITE: Completion of GERM1013 with a C or better, three years of recent high-school German, or department consent.

GERM 2013 Intermediate German II - (S). This course is a continuation of GERM 2003. Grammar is reviewed and expanded. It includes cultural readings. PREREQUISITE: Completion of GERM 2003 with a C or better, or department consent.

SPAN 1003 Elementary Spanish I - (F, S, SUM). Introductory course designed for students beginning the college-level study of Spanish. Presentations of basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and Hispanic culture enable the student to understand, speak, read, and write basic Spanish. No prerequisite.

SPAN 1013 Elementary Spanish II - (F, S, SUM). This course is a continuation of SPAN 1003. Presentations of vocabulary, grammatical structures, and Hispanic culture enable student to strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. PREREQUISITE: Completion of SPAN 1003 with a C or better, or department consent.

SPAN 1303 Introduction to Spanish Conversation and Culture I – (F, S). This course is an introduction to the language and cultures of the contemporary Hispanic world. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will also practice some basic reading and writing in Spanish. Some classes meet regularly with a group of native Spanish speakers for a language and culture exchange.

SPAN 1313 Introduction to Spanish Conversation and Culture II – (On Demand). This course is a continuation of Conversational Spanish I. Prerequisites: SPAN 1303 Introduction to Spanish Conversation and Culture I with a C or better or consent of department.

SPAN 2003 Intermediate Spanish I - (F, S). Students will be expected to apply their prior knowledge of Spanish and expand on their skills in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension concerning past, present and future events. It includes readings in Spanish literature, culture, and civilization. Class is conducted in Spanish. PREREQUISITE: Completion of SPAN 1013 with a C or better, three years of recent high-school Spanish, or department consent.

SPAN 2003-H Intermediate Spanish I-Honors- (F). Students will be expected to apply their prior knowledge of Spanish and expand their skills in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension concerning past, present, and future events. This honors course will include readings and discussions of Spanish literature, culture, and civilization. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information.

SPAN 2013 Intermediate Spanish II - (F, S). This course is a continuation of SPAN 2003. Emphasis is on reading, composition, and oral practice. It includes cultural readings. Class is conducted in Spanish. PREREQUISITE: Completion of SPAN 2003 with a C or better, or department consent.

 

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Journalism

Journalism students are welcome to participate in the NWACC Eagle View student newspaper, published in print two to four times each fall and spring semester and viewable online at old.nwacc.edu/stunewspaper.

JOUR 1023 – Introduction to Mass Communication - (F,S on demand). A survey of mass media (newspaper, radio, TV, magazine, advertising, public relations, photography, music, new media, etc.) which covers the importance and impact of mass media on society and introduces the student to the various area of professional work in journalism. Recommended for students considering journalism as a major.

JOUR 1053 Fundamentals of Journalism – (F,S). Introduces students to the skills of observation, critical thinking and the concise, correct, accurate writing required in all aspects of journalism, as well as to the technology needed in upper-level courses. Practice using references for grammar and journalistic style. This course is a prerequisite for upper-level journalism courses at institutions that offer a journalism degree.

JOUR 0004V Student Newspaper Lab - (F,S). Students may earn credit for participation on the staff of a student publication.  Emphasis will be on news gathering, news and feature reporting, design and layout, and meeting deadlines. 

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Music

MUSI 1003 Music Appreciation - (F, S, SUM). A survey of music history with an emphasis on listening to all types of music in order to develop critical listening skills. Includes the works of major composers, media through which music is produced, instruments of the orchestra, voice, elements of music, forms and terminology. Attendance at selected live concerts is required.

MUSI 1101 Chamber Singers - (F, S). An auditioned vocal ensemble that performs music from all periods, Medieval to Modern.  May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor is required for admission. Meets three hours each week.

 

MUSI 1221 Beginning Class Piano - (F, S). Small-group instruction for beginning piano students. Extra fee charged. Meets one hour each week.

MUSI 1231 Private Piano - (F, S, SUM). One half hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MUSI 1221 Beginning Class Piano or consent of instructor.

MUSI 1232 Private Piano - (F, S). One hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MUSI 1221 Beginning Class Piano or consent of instructor.

MUSI 1301 Jazz Band (F, S) - Jazz Band is a performance based lab that is open to musicians of all skill levels. The course will deal primarily with the techniques needed to perform and improvise on standard jazz band repertoire. Performance material will include well known jazz standards, blues, rhythm changes, ballads, bossa novas, and jazz-rock fusion. Classes will also include lectures on jazz theory, harmony, and improvisation strategies. Students will supply their own instruments, and some public performances may be required.

MUSI 1331 Private Voice - (F, S, SUM). One half hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged.  May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1332 Private Voice - (F, S). One hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged. May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1411 Private Guitar - (F, S, SUM). One half-hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged.  May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1421 Beginning Guitar Class - (F, S). A basic course in the fundamentals and techniques of guitar playing. Class will perform as an ensemble.

MUSI 1501 NWACC Chorale - (F,S) The community choir of NWACC. The group performs several times each semester. May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1512 Private Organ - (F, S, SUM). One hour private lesson per week; extra fee charged. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MUSI 1232 Private Piano or consent of instructor.

MUSI 1603 Music Theory I - (S, On Demand). Principles of notation rhythm, meter, triads, dominant sevenths, tonality, major and minor scales, key signatures, intervals, cadences and four-part writing. Meets three hours each week. It is recommended that this be taken in conjunction with MUSI 1621Aural Skills I.

MUSI 1613 Music Theory II - (On Demand).

A continuation of MUSI 1603.Meets three hours each week. It is recommended that this be taken in conjunction with MUSI 1631 Aural Skills II, Prerequisite: MUSI 1603Music Theory I.

MUSI 1621 Aural Skills I - (S, On Demand). Development of aural perception through ear training, sight singing, and keyboard harmony. Two hours per week.

MUSI 1631 Aural Skills II - (On Demand). Continuation of Aural Skills I. Two hour per week. Prerequisite: MUSI 1621 Aural Skills I or consent of instructor.

MUSI 1643 Beginning Music Composition - (On Demand). An introduction to the art of music composition. Class activities will involve listening to selected compositions from music literature, analyzing their structures, and studying the compositional processes used to create the music. Students will then write original compositions using the selected pieces as models. If possible, the student works will be performed in class by the class members.

MUSI 1653 Basic Musicianship - (F). Basic study of the principles of notation, rhythm, melody, and harmony in order to experience practical application. Includes study of sight singing, ear training and keyboard skills.

MUSI 1703 Introduction to MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) - (F). An introduction to basic MIDI equipment and to several current software packages. Students will be offered hands-on training in basic digital recording techniques, notation software and sequencing programs.

MUSI 2001 Civic Symphony Orchestra – (F, S).  The Civic Symphony Orchestra of Benton County is in partnership with the NWACC Music Department. The orchestra is made up of professional musicians, volunteers, and students. It performs standard symphony repertory with one concert each semester. Miles Fish, conductor.

MUSI 2903 Musical Theatre Production (On Demand). Consists of the production of a Broadway style musical, with class members participating in all facets of the production. Lead roles selected by audition.

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